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Low B12 may be linked to autism, dementia, schizophrenia

Low B12 may be linked to autism, dementia, schizophrenia

Brain levels may reveal more than blood levels
By Shara Rutberg, New Hope Network

What do the brains of people with dementia, autism and schizophrenia have in common? Low levels of vitamin B12, according to a recent study, the first to compare levels of the vitamin in brains throughout the human lifespan.

Findings from the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, suggest that a variety of neurological diseases like dementia and disorders like autism and schizophrenia, could be related to poor uptake of vitamin B12 from the blood into the brain, according to the researchers. Blood levels of B12 don’t always match the levels of the vitamin in the brain, and, brain levels decrease more over the years than blood levels.

For the study, a team led by Richard Deth, PhD, professor of pharmacology at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, analyzed the brains of more than 60 deceased people. They ranged in age from fetus to 80 years.

The subjects included 12 people who had autism and nine with schizophrenia.

The vitamin B12 levels in the brain were 10 times lower in the oldest people compared with the youngest, reflecting a gradual, natural, and consistent decline over the years.

The researchers found that the levels of vitamin B12 in the brains of young people with autism and in middle-age people with schizophrenia were about one-third of the levels found in similarly aged people who did not have these neurological conditions. The people in the study with autism, who were all under age 10, had levels similar to those found in a 57-year-old.

The findings support an emerging theory that the human brain uses vitamin B12 in a tightly regulated manner to control gene expression and to spur neurological development at key points during life, according to a livescience.com post about the research.

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A.J. Ali

A.J. Ali, "The Wellness Motivator!" is an award-winning writer, producer, actor, host, voice over artist, emcee and creative visionary. He is the Founder and Executive Producer of EclipseVSC since 1999. A.J. is currently producing and hosting the multimedia wellness entity "Wellness 101" with a vision of helping to change the focus of healthcare in America from sickness to wellness (www.wellness101life.com). To launch the Wellness 101 brand, A.J. did the impossible. Starting with only $500, he traveled through all 50 states in 101 days June 16 through September 24, 2014 -- starting in Melbourne Beach, FL and ending up on a sun soaked beach in Hawaii after changing lives in all 50 states. His "True Champion's 30-Day Challenge" book is transforming lives nationwide (www.TrueChampions30DayChallenge.com). Now, Wellness 101 is taking human transformation to another level through holistic wellness. A.J. has more than 30 years experience in sports and entertainment as an athlete, artist and social entrepreneur. He has founded and owned two pro soccer teams and has spearheaded hundreds of successful projects. A.J. created and starred in the TV show "Good Fellas of Baltimore" on Fox in 2011, which raised more than $250,000 for charities in Baltimore and inspired fans to join the cast to help people in need. As an on-air talent and voice over artist, his enthusiastic love of people makes him believable and inspirational. As a wellness speaker and emcee, he is inspiring. An accomplished writer with a conversational style, his work is transformative. His 2007 song "Through the Darkness, Into the Light," compilation music CD "Survivor Celebration" and Survivor Celebration campaign helping cancer survivors won the coveted Hollywood FAME Award for National Community Service. As a philanthropist and entrepreneur, A.J. has raised more than $25 million for charities. He teaches his charity event success methods through a workshop called "MAKE IT RAIN." He is proud to be a U.S. Air Force Veteran (83-87). His mantra is "LOVE is the answer." He is an avid golfer.

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